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463 Matches
See Full List Expand Collapse All Updated on: 11/14/2019
  1. 1

    Jared Kelley (BA RANK: 12 )

    Refugio (Texas) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 215 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Texas
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    A man among boys in the high school class, Kelley is the most MLB-ready prep pitcher thanks to his current stuff and physicality. Standing 6-foot-3, 215 pounds, Kelley runs his fastball up into the 97-99 mph range with shocking ease. He looks like he’s playing catch on the mound with a loose, fluid delivery and little to no head whack in his finish. Perhaps in part because of the ease of his entire operation, Kelley locates his premium stuff in a way that’s beyond his years, with some scouts projecting him to have future plus command. The ease in which he does everything makes it look like his fastball explodes out of his hand, and he pairs that pitch with a low-80s plus changeup that he throws with good arm speed. The pitch is a swing-and-miss offering with excellent diving life and, like he does with his fastball, Kelley shows good feel to spot it where he wants in or out of the strike zone. The biggest question with Kelley entering the spring was in regard to his breaking ball. Over the summer he showed a slider in the low 80s, sometimes-slurvy slider. It was inconsistent and far from the wipeout projection that teams would like to see out of the top high school pitcher in the class. While Kelley didn’t get a full spring season, scouts still saw signs of improvement from his breaking ball and gave it a chance for it to become average or above-average. Kelley will battle the stigma and spotty track record that comes with being a hard-throwing high school righty, while also competing in one of the strongest college pitching classes in recent memory. Still, he does several things at an exceptionally high level that are impossible to teach, and has No. 2 starter upside. Kelley is committed to Texas.

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  2. 2

    JT Ginn (BA RANK: 23 )

    Mississippi State RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Dodgers '18 (1)
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    After being selected by the Dodgers in the first round out of high school in 2018, Ginn entered the 2020 season as a draft-eligible sophomore with a chance to double up on the accomplishment. However, he made it through just three innings of his first start of the season against Wright State before exiting the game. It was later announced the Ginn would need surgery on his right elbow and that he would miss the season. While the rest of the college season was canceled due to the novel coronavirus, Ginn’s status is more up in the air after being considered a top-15 caliber player in the 2020 draft class. He has plenty of prospect pedigree going back to his high school days, when his pure stuff stacked up among the best arms of a loaded 2018 prep pitching class. As a high schooler, Ginn ratcheted his fastball up to 99 mph and buried a mean, wipeout slider as well. Rather than sign with Los Angeles at the back of the first round, he had a strong freshman season at Mississippi State and proved he could be a dominant starter. He posted a 3.13 ERA over 17 starts and 86.1 innings, while striking out 105 batters and walking 19. When healthy, Ginn possesses two potentially double-plus pitches. His fastball has impressive velocity, but the pitch’s life and running action makes it even more impressive. His slider has also been graded as a future plus-plus offering by some evaluators, and he has a solid changeup as well. Ginn showed he could hold his stuff over longer outings, repeat his delivery consistently and throw enough strikes to start, but now teams will have to decide whether to take the risk on his health. He could again be a difficult sign because of the additional leverage that comes with being a draft-eligible sophomore.

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  3. 3

    Cole Wilcox (BA RANK: 24 )

    Georgia RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-5 | Wt: 232 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Nationals '18 (37)
    Age At Draft: 20.9

    Wilcox was in the middle of an extremely talented Georgia prep pitching class in 2018, along with arms like Indians righty Ethan Hankins and Vanderbilt righty Kumar Rocker. Wilcox was seen as a day one talent at the time, with a projectable frame, plus fastball and two promising secondary offerings, but the depth of the class and his commitment to Georgia allowed him to slide. Two years later, Wilcox is again a potential first-round pick and one of many impressive draft-eligible sophomores in the 2020 class. Wilcox has worked with Georgia’s strength and conditioning coach, Ryan Gearhart, to add significant muscle to his 6-foot-5 frame in his two years at school. He’s now listed at 232 pounds and is one of the more physically intimidating pitchers in the country. His stuff matches his size, as Wilcox attacks hitters with a fastball that frequently gets into the 97-98 mph range and has touched 100 mph. After spending most of his time as a reliever in 2019, Wilcox entered the 2020 season as the Bulldogs’ Saturday starter behind Emerson Hancock and was off to a great start before the season was cut short. Wilcox posted a 1.57 ERA in four starts, with 32 strikeouts and just two walks in 23 innings. That walk rate is encouraging for teams, who are skeptical of Wilcox’s strike-throwing ability after he walked close to six batters per nine innings in 2019. Scouts would have liked to see him continue that trend against SEC batters, as Wilcox has a tendency to get scattered and miss the zone, but his stuff is overpowering enough that overmatched hitters would still chase out of the zone. Wilcox pitched mostly off of a 93-96 mph fastball as a starter, with a mid-80s slider that also grades as plus. He also throws a changeup in the same mid-80s range that could give him an average or better third offering. Wilcox was trending in the right direction prior to the season ending and was already a first round-type of talent entering the year, so how much a team likes his upside and buys into his improved control will determine where he goes. As an eligible sophomore, Wilcox will have more leverage than most college players and could be a costly sign.

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  4. 4

    Dillon Dingler (BA RANK: 27 )

    Ohio State C
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 210 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    Dingler has been a regular in Ohio State’s lineup since he first set foot on campus in Columbus. As a freshman he showed impressive defensive versatility at two premium positions, playing both catcher and center field. He settled in as the team’s starting catcher during his sophomore season, and scouts believe in his catch-and-throw skills and athleticism behind the plate. A natural leader and a captain for the Buckeyes, Dingler has big league arm strength, and over 115 total games with Ohio State threw out 21 of the 42 (50 percent) runners who attempted to steal against him. He has a strong, 6-foot-3, 222-pound frame that would be durable enough to handle the grind of the position, and he’s more athletic than most backstops with that sort of size. Offensively, Dingler was just starting to tap into his potential, improving year over year. He improved his OPS from .701 as a freshman to .816 as a sophomore. His numbers might have been even louder if he didn't miss some time early in the season due to a broken hamate that could have sapped some of his power even after returning to the field. Through 10 games in 2020 upped that mark to 1.164 with five home runs, a triple and four doubles through 35 at-bats. Dingler has always controlled the strike zone well throughout his Big 10 career (12.8 strikeout percentage, 11.6 walk percentage) but never really showed the ability to tap into his above-average raw power consistently in games. Some scouts believe he’s more of an ambush power hitter, who ran into his homers, and now without a full junior season to see if that is true, they’ll have to guess. With a strong offensive 2020 season, Dingler had the potential to go in the first two rounds and his everyday potential and big arm could keep him in that range even with a shortened season.

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  5. 5

    Chris McMahon (BA RANK: 30 )

    Miami RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Braves '17 (33)
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    McMahon has shown impressive athleticism and arm strength dating back to his high school days, when he was up to 95 mph and showed potential with two quality offspeed offerings. He ranked No. 76 in the 2017 BA 500, but made it to Miami and should go off the board well before that range in 2020. The top arm in southern Florida, McMahon has a solid collegiate track record with the Hurricanes and scouts believe his pitch metrics will excite analytically inclined evaluators as well. His fastball is a plus offering, regularly in the mid-90s, but the pitch plays better than its velocity thanks to deception and solid riding life. He also has a slider and a changeup. Some scouts have the slider as his better offspeed offering, calling it a plus breaking ball, while others are high on a changeup that gets plus grades as well. He pulls the string with that pitch and induces whiffs and ground balls from hitters of both sides. McMahon has also implemented a cutter, though some evaluators believe it’s not a true cutter, simply a more firm version of his slider. Whatever the pitch, scouts believe both breaking balls have plus potential. McMahon has a minor back injury on his resume, but he’s largely been successful when healthy and was off to his best collegiate season in 2020 with a 1.05 ERA in four starts and 25.2 innings, with 38 strikeouts and five walks. Some teams could like him as high as the 20s, and it would be surprising to see him slide out of the second round.

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  6. 6

    Casey Martin (BA RANK: 38 )

    Arkansas SS
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 175 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    Martin is perhaps the most toolsy college infielder in the 2020 class, with plus speed, arm strength, raw power and a chance for plus defense at shortstop as well. Typically, a college shortstop with that tool set goes among the top 10 picks. What holds Martin back is his ability to make the most of those tools, with an overly aggressive approach at the plate and less consistency than teams would like in the field. There are significant questions about the quality of Martin’s hit tool and his approach. After a loud freshman campaign in which he hit .345/.418/.556 with 13 home runs, Martin regressed a bit in his sophomore season, thanks mostly to less BABIP luck (.418 in 2018 compared to .344 in 2019). He still managed to hit 15 home runs, but scouts worry about how often he’ll get to that power at the next level with a career strikeout rate over 22 percent. He has always had a tendency to swing and miss frequently, both in the zone and outside of the zone, and those issues continued in his brief play in the shortened 2020 season. Scouts have also wondered why a runner with his speed and quick-twitch actions hasn’t had more success stealing bases (just 18 over his first two seasons), though he was off to a 6-for-6 start in 13 games as a junior. Defensively, Martin has a penchant for making highlight-reel plays, but he lacks the polish needed for an everyday player at the position. Some scouts believe he would be a better fit for center field or second base because of that, while others think he simply needs more reps. Martin could have significantly changed his draft stock—in either direction, depending on how he hit in SEC play—with a full season. Now teams will have to decide if they want to buy into his high-upside tools or avoid the risk he presents.

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  7. 7

    Carson Montgomery (BA RANK: 40 )

    Windermere (Fla.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Florida State
    Age At Draft: 17.8

    A 6-foot-2, 195-pound righthander committed to Florida State, Montgomery has a loud two-pitch mix featuring a fastball that’s already up to 96 mph and one of the better sliders in the prep class. Montgomery consistently showed an impressive ability to generate whiffs with both pitches, with his fastball up in the zone and his slider at the bottom and below the strike zone. His fastball sits more in the 90-93 range after he settles in, but the pitch comes out of a high three-quarters slot with good angle and features solid running life. His slider flashes plus consistently, with hard and late diving action that routinely fools hitters, though scouts mentioned that the pitch is inconsistent. Some cite a wrist wrap in the back of his arm slot that could lead to the inconsistencies of the breaking ball, which also limits his fastball command. Montgomery can lose the zone at times and his command is more scattered than teams would like from a prep arm with first-round stuff. Additionally, teams will have to project on Montgomery’s changeup, which is firm in the upper 80s with little movement, but could become a reliable third pitch with additional usage. A team that likes his chance to start long-term could take him in the back half of the first, though most of the industry might have him slightly after that range. He could be a tough sign, particularly within a shortened 2020 draft.

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  8. 8

    Jared Jones (BA RANK: 41 )

    La Mirada (Calif.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Texas
    Age At Draft: 18.9

    Scouts pegged Jones as a future first-round pick as a high school sophomore, and he’s done little to dissuade that notion. A three-time member of USA Baseball’s junior national teams, Jones is a twitchy, explosive athlete who stars both on the mound and in the outfield. His tremendous arm speed generates lively mid-to-upper 90s fastballs, and his elite athleticism has helped him make adjustments to his delivery and gradually improve his command and control. Jones dominates with his fastball, but he flashes a sharp, above-average slider in the mid-80s and is developing his changeup. Jones is slightly undersized and has an effortful delivery, leading some evaluators to project him to the bullpen. His improving command and elite competitiveness lead others to believe he can start. Jones is an above-average runner who gets excellent jumps in the outfield and makes jaw-dropping throws, earning 80 grades on his arm. He flashes big power at the plate, but he’s a free swinger who scouts aren’t sure will make enough contact against better pitching. Jones has strong baseball bloodlines in addition to his talent. His father, Keith, was a 1997 draft pick of the Diamondbacks and played two seasons in the minors. His cousins Randy and Ron Flores both pitched in the majors, and Randy is currently the Cardinals' scouting director. Jones made the right strides with his command this spring to remain a first-round talent as a pitcher. He is committed to Texas.

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  9. 9

    Daniel Cabrera (BA RANK: 42 )

    Louisiana State OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 180 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Padres '17 (26)
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Scouts have been infatuated with Cabrera’s swing since his days as a prep player. Out of Parkview Baptist High in Baton Rouge, evaluators admired his standout barrel control and a bat path that stayed in the zone for a long time. Known for his all-fields line drives in high school, Cabrera has started to tap into more of his raw power over three years at Louisiana State, highlighted by a 12-homer campaign in 2019. There aren’t many moving parts in Cabrera’s swing. It’s simple and easy and, like his prep days, he’s still capable of hitting the ball to all fields, which has helped him stay consistent. While his raw power is more above-average than plus, and mostly to the pull side, he’s the sort of hitter scouts believe will tap into everything he has during games. His power numbers were more suppressed last summer in the wood-bat Cape Cod League, so how his power transfers to a wood bat in pro ball is worth considering. Including 16 games in a shortened 2020 season, Cabrera is a .300/.382/.520 hitter in his LSU career. He has a corner-outfield profile and will likely be no more than average defensively there, and probably fits best in left field. Because of that, there’s more pressure on his bat, but he’s one of the college hitters who scouts generally feel comfortable with moving forward. He could sneak into the back of the first round or go off the board at some point in the second.

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  10. 10

    Cole Henry (BA RANK: 44 )

    Louisiana State RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 214 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Tigers '18 (38)
    Age At Draft: 20.9

    One of the talented draft-eligible sophomore pitchers in the 2020 class, Henry ranked No. 225 on the BA 500 in 2018, when he showed a fastball up to 97 mph as a high school senior with a big frame to match. Henry has started to fill out that frame in two years with Louisiana State and is now listed at 6-foot-4, 211 pounds. With the increased strength he’s also improved his stuff, most notably a breaking ball that now has plus potential. He still can run his fastball up into the 97 mph range, but sits in the 92-95 mph range more typically, with a two-seam fastball in his arsenal as well. His curveball is a power offering with impressive depth, and he’s also shown feel for a changeup that scouts believe can be plus as well. With plus stuff across the board, Henry has all the pieces to be a frontline arm, but scouts have wanted to see more consistency. When everything’s on at the same time he can be electric, but that happens infrequently because he struggles at times to put hitters away or land his off-speed stuff for strikes. Henry established himself as LSU’s No. 1 weekend starter as a freshman, when he posted a 3.39 ERA over 58.1 innings with 72 strikeouts and 18 walks. He was once again the Friday arm in 2020 through four starts before the season was canceled. In that time, Henry posted a 1.89 ERA over 19 innings with 23 strikeouts and six walks. With sophomore eligibility, Henry could be a tough sign but is solidly a Day One talent.

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  11. 11

    Alex Santos (BA RANK: 45 )

    Mount St. Michael Academy, Bronx, N.Y. RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 215 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Maryland
    Age At Draft: 18.3

    One of the better northeast arms in the 2020 class, Santos never got into a game for his high school team thanks to a shortened 2020 season, but got plenty of looks from scouts last summer. Santos throws from a three-quarters arm slot with a fastball that gets into the mid-90s and flashes plus. He pairs that with two secondary offerings that have plus potential, with plenty of spin on a curveball and a changeup that he worked on over the offseason. After throwing in an Alabama event this spring, scouts noted the improvement of the changeup, though his velocity wasn’t yet quite as high as it had been over the summer. Santos added weight and strength to his frame over the offseason as well, and is around 6-foot-3 and 215 pounds now. A projection profile, Santos has started to make the progress with his body that scouts anticipated would come. He has the strike-throwing ability and athleticism that portend a future starting role as well. There will be more risk with Santos due to the fact that teams simply couldn’t see him much this spring, but his father co-owns a facility in New York called Citius Baseball, and Santos has been able to regularly throw his bullpens and record his pitching data with a Rapsodo unit. That information will be useful for clubs who debate popping Santos early in the draft. He could sneak into the first round or go in the supplemental round or second. Santos is committed to Maryland.

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  12. 12

    CJ Van Eyk (BA RANK: 46 )

    Florida State RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Mets '17 (19)
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Van Eyk established himself as one of the more polished prep pitchers in the 2017 draft class. He ranked No. 109 on the BA 500 that year and would have been solidly in the top 100 of the class if it weren’t for health questions that stemmed from a forearm injury. Perhaps because of that, Van Eyk made his way to Florida State, where he has been extremely consistent. After starting just five games as a freshman, Van Eyk made a successful transition to a starting role in 2019, when he posted a 3.81 ERA over 99.1 innings and 18 starts, with more than 11 strikeouts per nine innings. He was off to another successful season in 2020, posting a 1.31 ERA over four starts and 20.2 innings with 25 strikeouts and 12 walks. Van Eyk gets things done with a solid three-pitch mix, including a fastball in the 90-95 mph range, a sharp, 78-80 mph downer curveball and an 81-84 mph changeup with sinking action that fools hitters on both sides. All three of those pitches are solid-average or better. Van Eyk can also spin a slider, but the pitch has less depth and less swing-and-miss potential than his curve. Van Eyk’s operation is clean, with a loose, fluid arm that comes from a deliberate windup with very little coil or torque in his lower half, some hooking action in the back and an easy, balanced finish. Everything about the operation screams starter, but Van Eyk’s stuff isn’t quite as explosive as the top-end pitchers in the class, which could make him more of a late first- or second-round pick.

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  13. 13

    Masyn Winn (BA RANK: 47 )

    Kingwood (Texas) HS SS/RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Arkansas
    Age At Draft: 18.2

    Pound for pound, Winn could be the most purely talented player in the 2020 class. A legitimate two-way player, the Arkansas commit is overflowing with plus tools on both sides of the ball. As a hitter, he has bat speed, surprising raw power for his size (5-foot-11, 180 pounds) and plus speed that plays out of the box and on the bases. At shortstop, Winn is an exceptional athlete with massive arm strength, solid hands and impressive natural instincts. On the mound, he’s as electric. He’s been up to 98 mph with his fastball and more typically sits in the 92-96 mph range. He pairs that with a hard slider that can get slurvy, but he’s shown good feel to manipulate the pitch and has also flashed a plus changeup. All of his stuff likely plays up thanks to some deception that comes from a short and quick arm stroke. Some inconsistency and his smaller frame lead to legitimate reliever question marks. Teams are mixed on whether his upside is better as a pitcher or a hitter. If you squint you can see an impact player on both sides of the ball, though he needs more refinement and maturity on both sides. He plays the game at a quicker speed than most, but that can get him into trouble. As a position player, scouts would like to see Winn slow the game down, be more consistent on routine plays at shortstop, stay within himself more at the plate and chase fewer pitches out of the zone. Some teams wonder if he should continue playing both ways like former Louisville star Brendan McKay. He did that in a Jupiter performance last fall that is one of the best two-way performances scouts have ever seen at the event—he flashed three plus pitches on the mound and produced exit velocities of better than 100 mph three times. Winn’s upside and talent are obvious, but questions about his size and the all-around polish to his game persist.

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  14. 14

    Kevin Parada (BA RANK: 48 )

    Loyola HS, Los Angeles C
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Georgia Tech
    Age At Draft: 18.9

    Parada won MVP of the 2018 WWBA World Championships as a junior and continued to perform at every major showcase last summer. He got off to a red-hot start this spring and had Southern California area scouts buzzing before the season shut down. Parada is widely considered one of the best prep hitters in the class. He’s a strong, powerful hitter who crushes both fastballs and offspeed pitches, and he has a long track record of performing against good competition. Parada stays in the strike zone, covers the whole plate and already posts exit velocities near 100 mph. Evaluators see a potential .280 or better hitter with a chance to hit 20 or more home runs. Parada is less certain to remain a catcher. He’s a good athlete, but he’s a fringe-average defender whose flexibility is a concern. His above-average arm strength is nullified at times by a long arm action. Some clubs want to make Parada an outfielder and let him focus on hitting. He is strongly committed to Georgia Tech and may be difficult to sign.

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  15. 15

    Isaiah Greene (BA RANK: 49 )

    Corona (Calif.) HS OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 180 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Missouri
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    Greene jumped on national radars last summer when he outplayed most of USA Baseball’s 18U National Team while facing them in scrimmages with a scout team. He got off to a slow start this spring before the season shut down, but still drew positive reviews from evaluators. Greene’s best asset is a smooth, lefthanded stroke that turns around high-end velocity. He drives the ball hard with ease, drawing comparisons to Garret Anderson and Michael Brantley, and projects as a consensus plus hitter with a chance to hit .300 in his best years. Greene’s power is still developing, but he has plenty of room to get bigger and stronger and makes enough hard contact to project above-average power. Greene is a plus runner with a chance to stay in center field, but his fringe-average arm and poor route-running have some scouts projecting him to left field. Like Anderson, Greene has a quiet demeanor and approach that is sometimes confused with a lack of effort. Greene’s hitting ability and overall athleticism have him safely among the top 50 players in the draft class. He is committed to Missouri.

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  16. 16

    Gage Workman (BA RANK: 51 )

    Arizona State 3B
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 185 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Brewers '17 (14)
    Age At Draft: 20.6

    Workman re-classified while at Basha (Ariz.) High to graduate a year early, making him one of the younger college players for the 2020 draft, perhaps with more growth potential than other college juniors. He’ll still be 20 when the draft takes place. As part of one of the best infields among Division I college teams, Workman has primarily played third base in deference to teammate Alika Williams but saw action at shortstop during his two summers in the Cape Cod League. Workman has gotten bigger and stronger since arriving at Arizona State, and while he’s slow out of the box he runs well underway and projects to have an intriguing combination of power and speed. A switch-hitter, Workman has better bat speed and more power from the left side. There’s some swing-and-miss to his approach, but he’s got plus raw power that will show better in games when he gets more experience. Workman is athletic and rangy, with the tools to be a plus defender at third base and has at least a solid-average arm with good carry. Some area scouts prefer Workman over Williams because of his more impressive set of tools. There’s still rawness to his game and he likely would have benefited significantly from having a full junior season, but Workman is toolsy with a chance to be solid at either position on the left side of the infield.

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  17. 17

    Daxton Fulton (BA RANK: 52 )

    Mustang (Okla.) HS LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 225 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Oklahoma
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    The 2020 prep lefthander class looked exceptionally strong last summer with Virginia lefthander Nate Savino and Fulton in the mix. But the demographic took big hits when the former enrolled early at Virginia and the latter suffered an elbow injury that required Tommy John surgery and ended his high school career. When healthy, Fulton had legitimate first-round chances as a super projectable, 6-foot-6, 225-pound lefthander with a big breaking ball. While Matthew Liberatore was more advanced at the same time, some scouts have drawn comparisons with the two because of those elements. Over the summer, Fulton’s fastball mostly ranged from 89-93 mph out of a clean, three-quarters arm action. His breaking ball is a big, deep bender in the mid-to-upper 70s with terrific spin and depth. At the Area Code Games, Fulton posted spin rates in the 2,600 rpm range and the pitch looked like a future plus offering. It’s particularly tough on lefthanded hitters thanks to the angle Fulton creates in his delivery. He showed solid feel to land the pitch despite its movement, and at the Perfect Game All-American Classic he landed three in a row to Florida outfielder Zac Veen to strike him out looking. In addition to his fastball and curveball, Fulton occasionally showed a mid-80s change, though he needs to develop more feel for that pitch. Scouts were impressed with the progress that Fulton was making throughout the summer before he got injured, as he had a lot of moving parts in his delivery that he cleaned up and also improved the consistency of his curveball. His draft status is now clouded because of his injury, though a team could still buy into his upside enough to take him on day one. If not, he will head to Oklahoma, where he could re-establish his first-round potential in 2023.

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  18. 18

    Jeff Criswell (BA RANK: 53 )

    Michigan RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 225 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Tigers '17 (35)
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    Criswell showed promising stuff coming out of high school, with a fastball that got into the mid-90s at its best, and a projectable, 6-foot-3, 185-pound frame. He was a projection arm who scouts wanted to see go to college and add strength and consistency—which is exactly what he did. Criswell stepped into a high-usage reliever role as a freshman and led Michigan with 24 appearances while posting a 2.23 ERA. While his walk rate was a bit erratic, he improved that mark in his second season as he transitioned into a starting role. Again, he had success, posting a 2.72 ERA and improving his strikeout and walk rates. As a junior, Criswell is now listed at 6-foot-4 with a strong, 225-pound frame and a solid three-pitch mix. His fastball regularly gets anywhere from 94-97 mph, and he pairs the offering with a slider and changeup that both have average potential. Scouts would have liked to get more time to bear down on Criswell this spring, but he threw just 24 innings over four starts, getting hit around a bit by Pepperdine in his last outing. There is some concern about whether Criswell fits best in a starter or reliever role. He has enough stuff to succeed in either, but without improved control at the next level (he’s walked 4.5 batters per nine through his Michigan career) he might fit best in the bullpen. However, he has taken steps to improve the walk rate each season, so he could simply continue learning how to harness his repertoire and limit the damage he does to himself. Criswell is a day one pick in a normal draft and should be off the board by the third round.

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  19. 19

    Logan Allen (BA RANK: 54 )

    Florida International LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 170 | B-T: R-L
    Commit/Drafted: Orioles '17 (16)
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    A polished strike thrower going back to his prep days, Allen posted a stunning 126-to-9 strikeout-to-walk ratio as a senior at University High in Orange City, Fla. At the time, his fastball topped out at 93, but he mixed and matched effectively enough to overpower the competition. His profile is much the same after three seasons with Florida International. Without an overpowering fastball, Allen has still had nothing but success as a starter, with a career 3.33 ERA and 246 strikeouts to 47 walks in 183.2 innings. He can run his fastball into the 93-94 mph range, but he usually pitches in the 90-91 range. The pitch plays above its below-average velocity thanks to deception and command, though he has turned what was a fringe-average changeup into a legitimate plus offering. He also has a curveball that’s more of an average pitch. Despite no truly overpowering offerings, Allen is confident in his stuff and pitches fearlessly inside against any hitter. In his abbreviated junior season, Allen racked up double-digit strikeouts in three of his first four starts, finishing with a 2.45 ERA over 25.2 innings with 41 strikeouts and just six walks. Allen also had a strong summer in the Cape Cod League, where he struck out 24 batters and walked three in 15 innings. In addition to his pitching accomplishments, Allen has been a two-way player for FIU every season and is a career .297/.362/.410 hitter while playing first base. His pro future is on the mound, and he should be a safe second-round pick.

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  20. 20

    Chase Davis (BA RANK: 55 )

    Franklin HS, Elk Grove, Calif. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 210 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Arizona
    Age At Draft: 18.5

    A toolsy, physical outfielder out of Northern California, Davis has a strong 6-foot-1, 210-pound frame, impressive bat speed, raw power and a big arm. Davis is the type of athlete who jumps off the field quickly in a showcase environment thanks to his tool set. He recorded a 99 mph throw from the outfield at Perfect Game’s National showcase at the start of the summer, and scouting departments voted Davis as the second-best outfield arm in the 2020 class. Additionally, he can show impressive raw power in batting practice. The Arizona commit has also shown the ability to get to his tools during games. He was particularly impressive last fall in Jupiter, where he hit a home run, two triples and a double in six games, showing solid contact and the ability to drive the ball in a game setting. Davis’ swing can get a bit long, which can hurt him, as does his ability to pick up and recognize offspeed offerings. When he stays within himself and times up pitchers, however, he does a lot of damage. Some scouts have given him 70-grade bat speed and love how long he keeps the barrel in the zone. Mechanically, he can get himself into poor positions with a deep, tight bat wrap, but when he launches for contact his bat path is direct with natural loft that helps him get to his above-average power. Defensively, Davis needs continued refinement, but he’s a solid enough runner to develop into at least an average defender in a corner with more than enough arm to fit in right field. Davis has an impressive work ethic and loves to get in the gym, as his physique suggests.

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  21. 21

    Nick Garcia (BA RANK: 56 )

    Chapman (Calif.) RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 215 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    Garcia played third base his freshman year at Chapman before converting to pitching as a sophomore. He served as the closer on Chapman’s 2019 Division III national championship team and was named Most Outstanding Player of the College World Series. Garcia moved to the Panthers rotation this spring and became one of the fastest-rising prospects in the country before the season shut down. A strong 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, Garcia has an easy operation and smooth delivery, allowing him to maintain his stuff and pound the strike zone with all three of his pitches. He throws his fastball in the 92-95 mph range, touching 97-98, and backs it up with an upper-80s slider and mid-80s cutter that both have a chance to be above-average. Garcia has a limited track record as a starter and has rarely faced good competition, but he held his own pitching in relief in the Cape Cod League last summer. He is also young for a college junior and will be barely 21 on draft day. Garcia’s stuff, delivery, youth and fresh arm have teams interested on the draft’s first day. He is in line to be the highest Division III player selected since the Nationals drafted Jordan Zimmermann in the second round in 2007 out of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.

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  22. 22

    Colt Keith (BA RANK: 57 )

    Biloxi (Miss.) HS SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 195 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Arizona State
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    A 6-foot-3, 195-pound infielder, Keith made a name for himself as an underclassman and was named the Gatorade 2018-19 Mississippi Player of the Year after hitting .527 with eight home runs. Keith showed a knack for putting the barrel on the baseball last summer against the top pitchers in the 2020 class and scouts believe he has an impressive array of plus tools. He has plus raw power, is a plus runner and also has plus arm strength. He has gotten on the mound and throws in the low 90s, but he’s definitely a pro prospect as a hitter. A shortstop now, Keith might be forced to move to another position as he fills out his frame and gains strength. Some evaluators think he gets by defensively because of his natural athleticism and wonder if he has the hands for the position. Some scouts believe third base or an outfield position could be better fits, and he has the arm strength to hang at the hot corner or right field. Keith could be an average hitter, with good impact ability now and more on the way. He drives the ball hard to the opposite field and can easily pull the ball out of the park. Keith has an upright stance with some hand movement that prevents him from getting fully extended all the time, but when he does, he can do plenty of damage. His pure tool set fits in the second round or better but what a team thinks of his most likely defensive home and the quality of his hit tool will determine if he gets signed or makes it to campus at Arizona State.

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  23. 23

    Clayton Beeter (BA RANK: 58 )

    Texas Tech RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    Beeter was a freshman All-American as a redshirt freshman in 2019, coming off a season in which he saved eight games in 21 appearances with a 3.48 ERA. He transitioned into a Friday night role for Texas Tech this spring, and performed well over four starts. In 21 innings Beeter posted a 2.14 ERA with 33 strikeouts (14.1 per nine) and four walks (1.7 per nine). As he’s gotten further from a Tommy John surgery he had in high school his stuff has gotten better and he’s thrown more strikes. Beeter was extremely erratic in 2019 (8.7 walks per nine) but showed significantly better control in a shortened 2020 season. Additionally, Beeter has a powerful pitch mix with a fastball that has gotten up to 97 mph, with a hammer curveball with top-to-bottom shape that has plus potential. Teams would have liked to see Beeter over a full season to see if his stuff and control were maintained the entire year in a starting role. The pitch analytics on both his fastball and curveball are reportedly impressive, and he has a solid arm action with a higher slot. Without a full 2020 season to scout him, teams will have to determine if the real Beeter is the 2020 version, the 2019 version or some hybrid between the two. He could be drafted as high as the second round to a team that believes he’s a starter.

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  24. 24

    Victor Mederos (BA RANK: 59 )

    Westminster Christian Academy, Miami RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 215 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Miami
    Age At Draft: 19.0

    A two-time Under Armour All-American, Mederos has been seen early and often by the national scouting community and brings a physical, workhorse’s frame to the table at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. Mederos was running his fastball up into the mid-90s and showing a hammer of a curveball before his junior season and showed similar stuff last summer. Over the offseason, Mederos worked on improving his body. Scouts say he came out early this spring looking much better in that regard, but his results were inconsistent. When Mederos is at his best, he looks like one of the better pitchers in the 2020 class. He runs his fastball up to 95-96 mph consistently and backs it up with a two-seam fastball, curveball, slider and changeup. In previous years Mederos focused on throwing all of his off-speed offerings in any count, and has developed a good feel for landing those pitches consistently, but his fastball command has been more erratic. He has shown a tendency to overthrow at times, and repeating a consistent release point with the pitch has been a challenge, leading some scouts to question his athleticism. Others believe he has solid athleticism for a big-bodied pitcher but also acknowledge that he needs to be more consistent in his delivery. While he has typically shown a 60-grade fastball, the pitch appeared closer to fringe-average in his final starts before the season ended. His curveball is his best secondary pitch, with a spin rate in the 2,600-rpm range as well as excellent power and finish. Some scouts have graded the pitch as high as a 70 on the traditional 20-80 scouting scale. However, Mederos needs to improve the consistency of that offering, like the rest of his operation. Each of his other offerings have a chance to be at least average, giving him plenty of weapons to mix and match from at-bat to at-bat. Mederos has a big league-caliber frame and repertoire, but teams will need to be confident in his ability to refine his entire game to sign him out of a Miami commitment. His natural talent fits as high as the first round, but inconsistencies and questions about strike-throwing could push him into the second or third.

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  25. 25

    Alejandro Rosario (BA RANK: 60 )

    Miami Christian HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 165 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Miami
    Age At Draft: 18.4

    Voted by scouts as a preseason second-team All-American, Rosario has an electric right arm, which he uses to fire a fastball that gets up to the 97-98 mph range. Standing at just 6-foot-1, 165 pounds, Rosario is undersized and smaller than most of the prep pitchers in the same talent range in the 2020 class. Despite his size, he has a fairly clean delivery without a ton of effort. In addition to Rosario’s fastball, he has a split-change and a slider which have both shown above-average potential. Rosario was one of the most reliable arms with Team USA’s 18U National Team last summer, throwing 13 innings with a 1.38 ERA, nine strikeouts and two walks. Despite his pure stuff, scouts have some concerns about how everything plays. This spring, scouts noted that he wasn’t missing many bats, which is alarming considering his velocity was still up to 97. There’s not a lot of deception in Rosario’s operation, and scouts wonder how his fastball will play at the next level. They would also like to see more tilt and depth out of his slider, which dives more vertically than horizontally and can often blend into his split change. Both offspeed offerings are in the same 79-84 mph velocity range. Scouts love Rosario’s arm strength and laud his competitive makeup, but with questions about the playability of his stuff and size, teams might be prevented from taking him in a range where he would sign away from his Miami commitment. With a refined breaking ball and more whiffs against his fastball at the next level, Rosario could work himself into a no-doubt first-round talent. For now, he’s just outside that range.

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